IKEA’s Global Sourcing Challenge: Indian Rugs and Child Labor

Question 1

IKEA should partake in the program since the documentary was produced by a renowned German firm gaining great influence and credibility. Therefore, it will be harmful to the business manager, Marianne Barner, to ignore or miscalculate such an opportunity. However, a response head on is not only essential but imperative. IKEA would assess and deliberate the information it gathered from ILO and UNICEF while demonstrating similar boldness as director of the documentary and push same objectives of eliminating child labor. It might turn the issue around through showing appreciation to the director for assisting in identifying child labor at the firm’s manufacturing.  Barner should mention IKEA’s insufficient engagement in social responsibility while revealing that the enterprise lingered at reactive step but not interactive or proactive step. As a result, the inadequate commitment accounts to reasons of the corporation keeping undergoing environmental and social issues pushed by the community…

Question 2

Barner understood that IKEA should take on the concern and sign up to the industry-wide response to the emerging issue about child labor in Indian carpet production (7). Moreover, Rangan Export is one the primary suppliers of IKEA, hence, cutting them could cost the company millions of dollars in sales. Therefore, since IKEA started addressing the subject in 1994, there must be policies that have been set in place for terminating the suppliers who opted not to comply with the addendum. As a result, Barner’s ultimate solution will entail IKEA finding a way to keep the contract with Rangan Export while emphasizing that children should not work at the looms…

Order a Similar or Custom Paper from our Writers